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1.

Why is learning task analysis important? How to do learning task analysis? What can the outcomes of the learning task analysis help us in instructional design? The importance of a learning task analysis

For instructional design, task analysis is an important process. First and foremost, a learning task analysis offers the instructional designer the skills to articulate effectively the kind of learning that he or she expects of his/her learners and thus the instructor is advantaged to have the professional command on how best to perform his or her instructions. According to Dick, Carey, and Carey (2009), a learning task analysis helps the tutor or the instructional designer to: set right the instructional goals and objectives break down the tasks so that the students can understand them better. The instructional designer is also placed at the advantage of being able to establish and select the most appropriate and even the effective most instructional goals. He or she is uniquely able to set right the priority for the tasks as well as their sequence.

How to carry out learning task analysis

To carry a learning task analysis effectively, it is important for an instructional designer has to classify the tasks in accordance to learning outcomes, generate a task list, and carefully select the tasks. Lastly decomposing of the task together with the right sequencing is done. The outcomes of the learning task analysis serve as the end point for self-evaluation by the designer based on the learners’ performance. This way, the design learns on the strength or weaknesses of the instruction; which in turn act as a future reference.

1. How do you know when you have gone deep enough in your subordinate task analysis?

Subordinate skill analysis and provide a comprehensive analysis of the instructional goal. Here, the designer analyses each of the goals set. This analysis is done in depth to assure that both the steps and the sub steps of the goal(s) are captured and assessed. Steps and sub steps refer to the supporting information that the learners require. This subordinate task analysis aims at determining the prerequisite knowledge which a learner must possess to be able to adequately perform. In regard to this, it is then evident that the designer, by using the learner outcome, is in better position to ascertain that he had done an in-depth subordinate task analysis.

Reference

Dick, W., Carey, L., & Carey, J. O. (2009). The systematic design of instruction. Upper Saddle River, N.J:

Merrill/Pearson, 39-89.

1. Why is learning task analysis important? How to do learning task analysis? What can the outcomes of the learning task analysis help us in instructional design? The importance of a learning task analysis

In a modest form, a learning task analysis can be defined as the process of decomposing down a skill, usually a complex one, into smaller and more manageable steps and sub-steps by an instructional designer in order to teach the learners tactfully. This depends on how best the tutor prepares the instructions. According to Dick, Carey, and Carey (2009), the process entails proper articulation of the instructions, which the instructional designer feel best for his or her learners. the instructor is able to set right the instructional goals and objectives, select the most appropriate instructional goals and objectives as well as setting the priority right for the tasks sequence and establish right the instructional activities and strategies to foster effective learning, select the appropriate learner and media environments and construct well thought out performance assessments and evaluation criteria.

How to complete a learning task analysis

Provided that an instructional designer has understood the learning task analysis process in good way, the task analysis can be carried out as follows: one has to classify task in accordance to learning outcomes, generate a task list, select task in order of importance and feasibility. The instructional designer must also decompose the task into well simplified steps and sub-steps. He/she should also organize the in a sequential manner for cohesiveness of the learning process.

2. How do you know when you have gone deep enough in your subordinate task analysis?

Essentially, subordinate task analysis aims at evaluating the feasibility of the instructions as set by the instructional designer. Thus, for the designer to ascertain the depth of the subordinate task, he or she mostly rely on the outcomes of the learning process for the designer to effectively evaluate the instructions. under the subordinate task analysis phase, the designer analyses each of the goals set. This analysis is done in depth to assure that both the steps and the sub steps of the goal(s) are captured and assessed. By reflecting on the outcome of the learning skills as indicated by the learner’s capability, the instructor can know with exactness the scope of the analysis. Good performance is an indicator of thorough subordinate task Analysis.

Reference

 

Dick, W., Carey, L., & Carey, J. O. (2009). The Systematic Design of Instruction (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

 

1.  Why is the learning task analysis important?

In any instructional design, the learning task analysis is a critical step. It entails the breakdown of the learning instruction by the instructional designer and allows the designer to completely dissect each learning goal into steps which helps determine exactly what needs to be learned and which areas of learning will be required.  In many cases, this step also helps designers to narrow down the precise areas of learning that will need the most focus and brings clarity to the design model.  Proper completion of the learning task analysis will also help the designer to sequence the learning in the most appropriate manner. It should be appreciated that, as the skills are simplified more and more, the more independent the learner becomes and gradually, he or she becomes increasingly able to perform larger skills

How to complete a learning task analysis? 

First and foremost, completing a learning task analysis is to fully understand and state the learning goal.  Depending on which type of learning outcome is required, the goal may be simply stated or may require a more complex analysis.  Once the designer breaks down all requisite steps to complete the learning goal, a flow chart is utilized to offer a visual tool for the designer.  The flow chart shows all learning elements required to successfully complete the learning goal.

What can the outcomes of the learning task analysis help us with in instructional design?

The outcomes of the instructional designer efforts are a reflection of how good or fair the instructions are. They show any gaps or other issues (particularly regarding what the learners are capable of prior to beginning the instruction) in the steps required to complete the instruction.

2.  How do you know when you have gone deep enough in your subordinate task analysis?

Under the subordinate task analysis phase, the designer analyses each of the goals set. This analysis is done in depth to assure that both the steps and the sub steps of the goal(s) are captured and assessed. Steps and sub-steps refer to the supporting information that the learners require. This subordinate task analysis aims at determining the prerequisite knowledge which a learner must possess to be able to adequately perform.

Generally speaking, the designer should have a thorough understanding of the basic skills expected of the learner prior to entry into instruction.  Upon checking through the outcome of the learning skill analysis with reference on the learners’ performance, satisfactory performance indicates a thorough undertaking by the designer on the subordinate skills analysis

References

Dick, W., Carey, L., & Carey, J. O. (2009). The Systematic Design of Instruction (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

1. Why is learning task analysis important? How to do learning task analysis? What can the outcomes of the learning task analysis help us in instructional design? The importance of a learning task analysis

Task analysis for instructional design is an important process for it entails the analysis and articulation of the kind of learning that an instructor expects of his learners and thus he or she gets the professional command on how to perform his or her instructions. Precisely, learning task analysis helps the tutor or the instructional designer to: set right the instructional goals and objectives, break down the tasks so that the student can understand them better, establish and select the most appropriate instructional goals and objectives as well as setting the priority right for the tasks’ sequence. The instructional designer is also able to establish right the instructional activities and strategies to foster effective learning, select the appropriate learner and media environments.

How to carry out learning task analysis

In order for an instructor to carry out effective learning task analysis procedure, he ought to understand the rule of the game by having the requirements at his or her fingertips. Generally, a typical learning analysis can be performed as follows: the designer has to classify tasks in accordance to learning outcomes, generate an appropriate and an optimal task list, select the tasks, decompose them and organize them in an appropriate order.

The importance of the outcomes of the learning task analysis in instructional design

The outcomes of the learning task analysis, serve as the end point for self-evaluation by the designer based on the learners’ performance. This way, the design learns on the strength or weaknesses of the instruction; which in turn act as a future reference.

How do you know when you have gone deep enough in your subordinate task analysis?

From the authors Dick, Carey, and Carey (2009), the designer is able to establish whether he or she had done an in-depth subordinate task analysis by reflecting on the outcome of the learning skills as indicated by the learner’s capability. Good performance is indicative of a thorough such process. In addition to this, knowing if I have gone deep enough in my subordinate task analysis can also is assessed from how properly I carry out the procedural analysis, cluster analysis, analysis techniques for attitude goals, analysis techniques for combination domains, and entry skill. This has to be done comprehensively.

Reference

Dick, W., Carey, L., & Carey, J. O. (2009). The Systematic Design of Instruction (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

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